The Dying Russians - The Holocaust of Shock Captialism

Tadhg Gaelach

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Sometime in 1993, after several trips to Russia, I noticed something bizarre and disturbing: people kept dying. I was used to losing friends to AIDS in the United States, but this was different. People in Russia were dying suddenly and violently, and their own friends and colleagues did not find these deaths shocking. Upon arriving in Moscow I called a friend with whom I had become close over the course of a year. “Vadim is no more,” said his father, who picked up the phone. “He drowned.” I showed up for a meeting with a newspaper reporter to have the receptionist say, “But he is dead, don’t you know?” I didn’t. I’d seen the man a week earlier; he was thirty and apparently healthy. The receptionist seemed to think I was being dense. “A helicopter accident,” she finally said, in a tone that seemed to indicate I had no business being surprised.

The deaths kept piling up. People—men and women—were falling, or perhaps jumping, off trains and out of windows; asphyxiating in country houses with faulty wood stoves or in apartments with jammed front-door locks; getting hit by cars that sped through quiet courtyards or plowed down groups of people on a sidewalk; drowning as a result of diving drunk into a lake or ignoring sea-storm warnings or for no apparent reason; poisoning themselves with too much alcohol, counterfeit alcohol, alcohol substitutes, or drugs; and, finally, dropping dead at absurdly early ages from heart attacks and strokes.

Back in the United States after a trip to Russia, I cried on a friend’s shoulder. I was finding all this death not simply painful but impossible to process. “It’s not like there is a war on,” I said.

“But there is,” said my friend, a somewhat older and much wiser reporter than I. “This is what civil war actually looks like. “It’s not when everybody starts running around with guns. It’s when everybody starts dying.”

In the seventeen years between 1992 and 2009, the Russian population declined by almost seven million people, or nearly 5 percent—a rate of loss unheard of in Europe since World War II. Moreover, much of this appears to be caused by rising mortality. By the mid-1990s, the average St. Petersburg man lived for seven fewer years than he did at the end of the Communist period; in Moscow, the dip was even greater, with death coming nearly eight years sooner.

 

Tadhg Gaelach

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Gangster Capitalist Andrei Shleifer


In the 1990s, the Clinton Régime pumped billions of US taxpayer funds into helping the drunken criminal Yeltsin to privatize the Soviet Union's vast wealth. Clinton set up one fund worth billions of dollars and asked Harvard's finance department to control it. Jewish professor Andrei Shleifer was put in charge of the fund, with his side kick Nancy Zimmerman, a Wall Street hucksterer, as second in command. However, the whole thing blew up in the face of the Clintons, as it it was discovered that Shleifer and Zimmerman were using the money to vastly enrich themselves, while robbing the Russians. It is not known if the Clinton crime family were getting any kick backs from this criminal arrangement.

When the whole thing blew up, the blame was put on Harvard and it was forced to pay back 26 million dollars to the US government. However, Shleifer was not sacked from his job at Harvard. He had to pay a two million dollar settlement and that was that. No wonder Russians today are so suspicious of any supposed olive branches coming from the US Régime.

 
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