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Valamhics Superior Knowledge Thread



Before Galileo, it was known that objects in freefall sped up on their way down, but nobody had a quantitative measure of how that speed increased. It was generally assumed that if an object fell distance y in the first second, it would fall 2y in the second second, 3y during the third, etc.

When Galileo dropped or rolled objects, he discovered that if an object fell/rolled a distance y in the first second, it fell three times as far, 3y, during the second, 5y during the third, 7y during the fourth, 9y, 11y, etc. In other words, not consecutive numbers, but rather the odd numbers.

To get the cumulative total distance after a given time, it is only necessary to add up all the numbers corresponding to each elapsed time. And we get:

1
+3 = 4
+5 = 9
+7= 16
+9 = 25
+11=36, etc.

So we have 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36….

If those numbers look familiar, they should. They are the perfect squares.

So the distance y traveled by an object is proportional to the square of the time, t² . To get a numerical answer, you multiply t² by the distance fallen in the first second, call it c, which for a freefall object is (in current-day SI units) 4.90 m. Nowadays we don’t use 4.90, which is the average speed for the first second, but rather 2c = 9.81, which is the speed it’s going at the end of the first second, which we call the acceleration, a.

So the formula becomes:

y=12at²
This was the concept until a Cavan farmer advanced the theory. There is no such thing as an object. There is just a collection of atoms. There is no such thing as a fall. There is just just the suspension/prevention on a collection of atoms from complying with space time and the release of that suspension/prevention

The use of square and cube is simply the dimensions of space viz: length breath and width, The 4th dimension being time. No one here could answer what the square root of minus 36 is,
 
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valamhic

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Val the greatest teacher is the one who makes it easy (to understand)

You make it very difficult
Then why are most 3rd level degree courses over 4 years? If it was easy why would one year not do
 

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Then why are most 3rd level degree courses over 4 years? If it was easy why would one year not do
I'd imagine a lot of degrees could be condensed to 3 years maximum.

That wasn't my point of course
 
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valamhic

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I'd imagine a lot of degrees could be condensed to 3 years maximum.

That wasn't my point of course
They could, but if you suffered from a serious medical complaint, would you attend a quack for treatment?
 

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They could, but if you suffered from a serious medical complaint, would you attend a quack for treatment?
Well, I remember when I went to university being a little disappointed as it didn't seem that much different to 6th year in school.

I definitely think my 1st and 2nd years could have been condensed to just one year.
 
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valamhic

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Well, I remember when I went to university being a little disappointed as it didn't seem that much different to 6th year in school.

I definitely think my 1st and 2nd years could have been condensed to just one year.
University for arts, History English is a bluff. There is no need to know any of it. Veterinary medicine , Medicine , engineering and accounting are tough subjects and take time.
 

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University for arts, History English is a bluff. There is no need to know any of it. Veterinary medicine , Medicine , engineering and accounting are tough subjects and take time.
I certainly didn't do an arts degree :)

A lot of qualifying as an accountant involves passing professional exams while working full-time
 
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valamhic

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I certainly didn't do an arts degree :)

A lot of qualifying as an accountant involves passing professional exams while working full-time
Yes and no, many people can never qualify. Its is a very hard subject. Such things as the revaluation of fixed assets group accounts are bitches

Pharmacy too. Several chemists children cannot qualify. Law is hard too. It suits me because of the type of brain I have. It is also wide in scope and requires accounting and taxation.

You cant learn that by working in a solicitors office doing the accounts of shops etc.
 
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Mowl

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Take a handful of quarter inch/ 8 mm round pebbles. About 150 of them. Take them from a heap weighing 100 kg.

Place an empty bean tin on the ground 15 meters away. Throw the pebbles towards the bean tin as best you can to try to get one or more pebbles into the can. If it does not go in first time, keep trying an adjusting your throw until one goes in. Say its on throw No 128, in one goes. Say you takes breaks and from you throw the 1st until one goes in takes 5 hours from 10 am. ie 3pm.

Imagine if a boy leaves his house down the street to visit you at 2.50pm and arrives at 3 PM. He sees you take a handful of pebbles and throw them. One goes in to the box. What would he immediately think?

'What the unholy fuck is that spacer doing now' ??
 

Mowl

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Regarding maths, I think it's mostly a fluke of nature to be proficient at it. My Uncle is an electrical engineer and was always a whizz at maths from a very early age. Most of the rest of the wider family including myself do not share that natural talent unfortunately.

Interesting; did your uncle ever find an equation that solves the mystery of why you stabbed me in the back?

Or does that also run in the family?
 

DrAwkward

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I have postulated the theory that the reason there is no square root of a minus number is that man has dictated it to make maths work as he wanted. A minus by a minus is not a plus at all. There is no such thing as a minus figure in nature.

Even if Mathematicians hadn't already done so previously, posters here on GPO
would have needed to invent negative numbers to describe your IQ Val! :LOL:

If it weren't for judicious use of i (root -1) your automatic cow milking machine, the washing machine you never grace with your manky jumpers, your expensive multi speed dildo and the computer you use to post your drivel would not have been possible! ;)

The concept is used extensively in the math used to analyse electronic circuit behaviour

 

DrAwkward

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Take a handful of quarter inch/ 8 mm round pebbles. About 150 of them. Take them from a heap weighing 100 kg.

Place an empty bean tin on the ground 15 meters away. Throw the pebbles towards the bean tin as best you can to try to get one or more pebbles into the can. If it does not go in first time, keep trying an adjusting your throw until one goes in. Say its on throw No 128, in one goes. Say you takes breaks and from you throw the 1st until one goes in takes 5 hours from 10 am. ie 3pm.

Imagine if a boy leaves his house down the street to visit you at 2.50pm and arrives at 3 PM. He sees you take a handful of pebbles and throw them. One goes in to the box. What would he immediately think?

I dunno.....

(a) The person has absolutely no life to speak of?
(b) "Shit, I better call social services again"?
(c) "Better run before I drown in the huge growing pool of drool "?
(d) "Hey that's my bean can, I'm calling the cops. Wait....he IS the cops!"?

...bored now... :sleep:
 
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